The Need for Law Space Match

"Hold on". Two words that law students are having trouble digesting when it comes to searching for jobs. Getting into law school reflects the driven, self motivated, problem solving, and controlling aspects of a typical law student's personality. Hard work starting from grade school, to college, to the LSAT paid off when that coveted acceptance letter finally came in the mail. So why is hard work not paying off in this economy, as employer after employer tell students to "Hold on"? It's no secret that this country is in a recession. As the number of law school graduates increase and the market dwindles, it is no surprise that employers are halting the hiring process.

At school, the stress of finding an associate position doesn't wait until graduation, but it has slowly started creeping in as early as the first year. Recent emails from our school's student services read, "Other Career Opportunities Outside the Legal Field" and "Nonprofit Volunteer Opportunities in the Area". Recent speakers visiting the school from big firms promote the "emotional fulfillment" that volunteering provides. As the debt slowly surmounts to six figures, and the career opportunities, even for those top in the class, dwindle, it is no wonder that students break into a hot sweat every time they hear the words "Hold on". As a second year, Type "A" personality, for me the stress of a future job has lead to anxiety and sometimes even heart palpitations. After talking to a recent third year student, on law review and moot court, I decided that if she couldn't get a paying job out of law school, my chances were slim to none. As a self-proclaimed tax law geek, I have recently begun considering the idea of getting an L.L.M. in tax. Not only would a master's degree give me an edge in the mediocre job market, it would delay graduating for another year. With the economy slowly on the rise, hopefully by the time I enter the job field, there will be a position available for me. But if not, then sharing law space with other attorneys is a viable option. Atlanta law space is available.

For those future attorneys who either cringe at the idea of another year of law school, or are ready to enter the job field immediately after graduation, there is Law Space Match. Law Space Match is a way for students to network with local attorneys in the area. Not only can these attorneys provide insight and experience, but the chance to talk to attorneys in the area provides networking opportunities, contacts, job references and even job leads. The best part about Law Space Match, especially for law students, is that creating an attorney profile and initiating these contacts is free. As more and more employers tell us students to "Hold on" until the economy gets better, Law Space Match provides a forum for us to network with local attorneys in the area interested in helping us start a rewarding career. In the past, hard work has gotten us where we want to be, when we want to be there. Although the economy will eventually turn around, and hopefully lawyers will begin to prosper financially again, students are able to connect to the local legal community through Law Space Match as the current job market forces us to "Hold on". Contributed by: Natalie Lynn Fears

The Ethics of Legal Office Sharing Arrangements or Subleasing

4 Simple Tips to Keeping it Clean:

The benefits of legal office sharing arrangements or subleasing are highly valuable: Money savings, camaraderie, and availability of professional consultation. The legal ethics are highly important, yet simple. Here are four simple tips for keeping your legal office sharing arrangement or subleasing in line with your state's ethics rules.

1. Maintain Appearance of Professional Independence. Make it crystal clear to the public that you are independent lawyers, not a firm. Never imply otherwise on your letterhead, business cards, office signage, and directory listings; when answering the phone; or in fee agreement. (ABA Model Rule 7.5) For example, the receptionist should answer the telephone, "Law Offices," not "Smith and Jones Law Offices." And, your letterhead should read, "Smith Law Office" while your office mate's letterhead should read, "Jones Law Office," not "Smith and Jones Law Offices." (Example of state ethics rule: Georgia Rule 7.5)

2. Maintain Absolute Confidentiality. Keep your client files absolutely confidential. This means separate staff, files, computers, telephones, and fax. Confidences must not be shared. For example, you can share a receptionist if she does not have access to your client information. (Example of state ethics rule: Georgia Rule 1.6)

3. Avoid Even the Appearance of Conflict. Do not contemporaneously represent clients with adverse interests to those of your office mates. (ABA Model Rule 1.10) For example, if your office mate is representing adoptive parents in an adoption, don't represent the birth mother. Just keep it clean. (Example of state ethics rule: Georgia Rule 1.7)

4. You Can Share Fees. Follow normal co-counsel and fee sharing ethics rules (ABA Model Rule 1.5). Either allocate fees based on services provided or one lawyer assumes responsibility for the case and the client consents to fee sharing in writing. For example, Lawyer Smith does 40% of the legal work and receives 40% of the legal fees and Lawyer Jones does 60% of the legal work and receives 60% of the legal fees. (For example of states ethics rule: Georgia Rule 1.5) These 4 tips for keeping it clean in legal office sharing arrangements or subleasing are meant to raise the red flag of awareness. Be sure to consult your state's ethics rules for specific guidance and examples specific to your state for your legal office sharing arrangement or subleasing.

Law Firms - Don't Use Your Empty Offices For Storage - It's a Waste

Law firm and empty offices - this is the norm now. Don't make your empty law offices storage depots. Empty law offices mean lost cash-flow. If your firm is using empty offices to store old files, office supplies or furniture, your law firm is in a lose-lose situation. Simply, you are paying a certain amount of dollars per square foot to your landlord or to your mortgage holder for this space (if you own it). Sadly, there is little relief in the near future with this economy. Deal with your surplus space--subleasing and space sharing is your answer. Advertising the surplus space has not worked. Where are viable subtenants? Because your law firm administrator may not necessarily have the experience of advertising surplus space or seeking compatible attorneys for subleasing, the file boxes, furniture and excess equipment continue to fill the surplus offices of your law firm. The answer is subleasing. Subleasing will mitigate the loss from surplus space.

Your solution is to go to www.LawSpaceMatch.com where you will be able to quickly post your empty law offices where an attorney searching the web by his or her desired zip code, will find your post quickly and easily. Don't miss out. Post your empty offices on www.LawSpaceMatch.com for a reasonable fee. Lawyers seeking a turn-key law office will contact you after locating your office through a detailed zip code search. Print advertising is expensive, and it has not worked for you because it does not reach the target market at the time you need to fill your space. The internet is your inexpensive solution.

Let www.LawSpaceMatch.com do the work for you...not your law firm administrator, managing partner, or an uninterested real estate broker. Move your files and furniture out of your unused offices today. Sublet or share unused space with lawyers seeking an office in your zip code.

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